choice36c
choice36c:

When have you ever seen Crackers, Europeans, crakkas, Asian Arabs, Asian Orientals, Jews, Hispanic or any other ethnic group post / address this atrocity depicted in this pic below? In fact, they tell you to forget about it because we live in a so called post racial society and you should never forget the current events that have affected every other ethnic group but YOURS. They direct your attention to praise and Master their murders while you forget the continuous struggle your ancestors and you face just to be left alone and succeed. Do you remember the time? Never mind, you don’t even have a clue about your true history which was destroyed to establish your current reality.

Never Forgive or Forget

choice36c:

When have you ever seen Crackers, Europeans, crakkas, Asian Arabs, Asian Orientals, Jews, Hispanic or any other ethnic group post / address this atrocity depicted in this pic below? In fact, they tell you to forget about it because we live in a so called post racial society and you should never forget the current events that have affected every other ethnic group but YOURS. They direct your attention to praise and Master their murders while you forget the continuous struggle your ancestors and you face just to be left alone and succeed. Do you remember the time? Never mind, you don’t even have a clue about your true history which was destroyed to establish your current reality.

Never Forgive or Forget

choice36c
choice36c:

Sugar Ray Robinson 
Back in the 40’s and 50’s, boxer Sugar Ray Robinson had the hottest club in Harlem “Sugar Ray’s Cafe.”  Numerous celebrities (black and white) patronized the club including Marilyn Monroe, Dinah Washington and Porifio Rubirosa.  You could also chow on fried catfish or snapper, black eyed peas, red beans and rice, deep fried chicken, bbq ribs, yams, greens and cobblers.
Backstory:
When Sugar Ray Robinson ruled the ring as a champion welterweight and middleweight in the 1940s and ’50s, the most important member of his team of corner men was neither his trainer nor his cut man.
It was, perhaps, Roger, his personal barber, to whom responsibility fell for Sugar’s highly maintained coiffure: flattened, straightened, greased and with a stylish wave.
“He never went into the ring without making sure his barber, Roger, put every strand in place after every round,” explained the Rev. Robert Royal, 80, a well-known Harlem minister and Robinson family friend. “Wherever you saw Ray, you saw Roger.”
And the place one would most likely see Robinson was in Harlem, where he strode over the vibrant night life like a colossus. He was Harlem’s darling.
There he was, cruising in his custom flamingo-pink Cadillac, or jumping behind the bar to mix drinks for the luminaries in his nightclub, Sugar Ray’s, which became a staple of New York’s social scene.
There was 940 St. Nicholas Avenue, where Robinson rented his mother a spacious apartment after he won his first big purse, $6,000, in 1941. There was the basement of the Salem Methodist Church, where Robinson learned to box after moving to Harlem from Detroit at age 11. And there was the string of buildings Robinson bought at Seventh Avenue and 124th Street where he opened Sugar Ray’s, which attracted celebrities like Frank Sinatra, Jackie Gleason, Nat King Cole, Lena Horne, Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughn, Nina Simone, Bob Hope and Elizabeth Taylor.
Robinson wore suits tailored by Sy Martin, who made garments for people like Duke Ellington. Robinson took his entourage — a prototype for what is now commonplace among celebrity athletes — on his travels abroad. It included his trainer, golf pro, nutritionist, manicurist, driver, and, of course, Roger the barber (whose last name has been lost).
Robinson was one of the first black celebrity athletes who was also a businessman, and one of the first high-profile black figures to invest in property in Harlem and to start his own business, setting an example for other black residents there, said Arthur Barnes, who was born and raised in Harlem and is now chairman of the board of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem.
Robinson used a mix of street savvy and business acumen to steer clear of mob fixers and vulture promoters.
Miles Davis idolized his style and dress.  Sugar agreed to give him boxing lessons.
“He hurt a few musicians who didn’t want to listen,” Robinson said of Davis. “He knew how to use his hands. I taught him.”
Davis always wore protective headgear to protect his trumpet-playing lips.
“Sugar Ray invited Miles to come up to the gym, and he come up every day when he was in town,” later, Davis slugged his drummer for arriving late to a gig and later explaining, “I had to Sugar Ray” his behind, using a less printable version of “behind.”
In the 1960s, when Harlem was in decline as a jazz and cultural mecca, Robinson moved to Los Angeles. He died, having burned through his glory and his millions, at age 67 after suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.
A man referred to as Mr. Johnson tried to persuade Robinson to invest his money, Robinson would say, “Oh, just get my clothes out of the cleaners,” Johnson recalled. “Sugar Ray later realized, ‘I should have listened to him.’ ”

choice36c:

Sugar Ray Robinson 

Back in the 40’s and 50’s, boxer Sugar Ray Robinson had the hottest club in Harlem “Sugar Ray’s Cafe.”  Numerous celebrities (black and white) patronized the club including Marilyn Monroe, Dinah Washington and Porifio Rubirosa.  You could also chow on fried catfish or snapper, black eyed peas, red beans and rice, deep fried chicken, bbq ribs, yams, greens and cobblers.

Backstory:

When Sugar Ray Robinson ruled the ring as a champion welterweight and middleweight in the 1940s and ’50s, the most important member of his team of corner men was neither his trainer nor his cut man.

It was, perhaps, Roger, his personal barber, to whom responsibility fell for Sugar’s highly maintained coiffure: flattened, straightened, greased and with a stylish wave.

“He never went into the ring without making sure his barber, Roger, put every strand in place after every round,” explained the Rev. Robert Royal, 80, a well-known Harlem minister and Robinson family friend. “Wherever you saw Ray, you saw Roger.”

And the place one would most likely see Robinson was in Harlem, where he strode over the vibrant night life like a colossus. He was Harlem’s darling.

There he was, cruising in his custom flamingo-pink Cadillac, or jumping behind the bar to mix drinks for the luminaries in his nightclub, Sugar Ray’s, which became a staple of New York’s social scene.

There was 940 St. Nicholas Avenue, where Robinson rented his mother a spacious apartment after he won his first big purse, $6,000, in 1941. There was the basement of the Salem Methodist Church, where Robinson learned to box after moving to Harlem from Detroit at age 11. And there was the string of buildings Robinson bought at Seventh Avenue and 124th Street where he opened Sugar Ray’s, which attracted celebrities like Frank Sinatra, Jackie Gleason, Nat King Cole, Lena Horne, Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughn, Nina Simone, Bob Hope and Elizabeth Taylor.

Robinson wore suits tailored by Sy Martin, who made garments for people like Duke Ellington. Robinson took his entourage — a prototype for what is now commonplace among celebrity athletes — on his travels abroad. It included his trainer, golf pro, nutritionist, manicurist, driver, and, of course, Roger the barber (whose last name has been lost).

Robinson was one of the first black celebrity athletes who was also a businessman, and one of the first high-profile black figures to invest in property in Harlem and to start his own business, setting an example for other black residents there, said Arthur Barnes, who was born and raised in Harlem and is now chairman of the board of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem.

Robinson used a mix of street savvy and business acumen to steer clear of mob fixers and vulture promoters.

Miles Davis idolized his style and dress.  Sugar agreed to give him boxing lessons.

“He hurt a few musicians who didn’t want to listen,” Robinson said of Davis. “He knew how to use his hands. I taught him.”

Davis always wore protective headgear to protect his trumpet-playing lips.

“Sugar Ray invited Miles to come up to the gym, and he come up every day when he was in town,” later, Davis slugged his drummer for arriving late to a gig and later explaining, “I had to Sugar Ray” his behind, using a less printable version of “behind.”

In the 1960s, when Harlem was in decline as a jazz and cultural mecca, Robinson moved to Los Angeles. He died, having burned through his glory and his millions, at age 67 after suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.

A man referred to as Mr. Johnson tried to persuade Robinson to invest his money, Robinson would say, “Oh, just get my clothes out of the cleaners,” Johnson recalled. “Sugar Ray later realized, ‘I should have listened to him.’ ”

choice36c
choice36c:

(CONTRACT KILLER FOR THE HIP-HOP INDUSTRY?)
Garelle Smith (directly above) is accused of murdering Soulja Slim (affiliated with Cash Money) and whispers indicate, he was allegedly involved with the Magnolia Shorty murder as well; Magnolia was also an Cash Money artist.  Allegedly, both murders were contract killings.
Allegedly, Smith was on speed dial with a number of hip-hop artists and moguls and he was also an enforcer for drug syndicates.
When a beef couldn’t be squashed or an artist was complaining about royalties, Smith was consulted.  If Smith couldn’t scare the artist with his presence, other measures would be taken.
Without warning, a powerful rap mogul began to consider Smith a “loose end,” who knew too much and knew where the bodies were buried.
He had to be eliminated.
Backstory:
2011: Smith had eluded prosecutors for years, but the fight to prove Garelle Smith’s trespasses into murder finally ended, but not because a case was built up against the consecutively accused criminal. Smith was found dead on Hamburg Street, New Orleans. A year after Magnolia Shorty’s murder.
In 2003, Garelle Smith was alleged to have been paid $10,000 to fatally shoot rapper Soulja Slim, but without a witness account, the case was dropped. Later that year, police claimed Smith was also the perpetrator behind the killing of Spencer Smith Jr. Again the case was dismissed for A similar lack of witnesses.
Time and again he was thrown in jail and let go. One noted conviction he received was for attempted possession of a firearm. Garelle Smith was found dead of several gunshot wounds blocks from his old home. The death of Soulja Slim, born James Tapp, was believed to be the result of a local record label dispute and is as yet unsolved. Detectives posthumously accused Tapp of murdering Robert Lee Paige J
Allegedly, Smith is accused of murdering several other people.

choice36c:

(CONTRACT KILLER FOR THE HIP-HOP INDUSTRY?)

Garelle Smith (directly above) is accused of murdering Soulja Slim (affiliated with Cash Money) and whispers indicate, he was allegedly involved with the Magnolia Shorty murder as well; Magnolia was also an Cash Money artist.  Allegedly, both murders were contract killings.

Allegedly, Smith was on speed dial with a number of hip-hop artists and moguls and he was also an enforcer for drug syndicates.

When a beef couldn’t be squashed or an artist was complaining about royalties, Smith was consulted.  If Smith couldn’t scare the artist with his presence, other measures would be taken.

Without warning, a powerful rap mogul began to consider Smith a “loose end,” who knew too much and knew where the bodies were buried.

He had to be eliminated.

Backstory:

2011: Smith had eluded prosecutors for years, but the fight to prove Garelle Smith’s trespasses into murder finally ended, but not because a case was built up against the consecutively accused criminal. Smith was found dead on Hamburg Street, New Orleans. A year after Magnolia Shorty’s murder.

In 2003, Garelle Smith was alleged to have been paid $10,000 to fatally shoot rapper Soulja Slim, but without a witness account, the case was dropped. Later that year, police claimed Smith was also the perpetrator behind the killing of Spencer Smith Jr. Again the case was dismissed for A similar lack of witnesses.

Time and again he was thrown in jail and let go. One noted conviction he received was for attempted possession of a firearm. Garelle Smith was found dead of several gunshot wounds blocks from his old home. The death of Soulja Slim, born James Tapp, was believed to be the result of a local record label dispute and is as yet unsolved. Detectives posthumously accused Tapp of murdering Robert Lee Paige J

Allegedly, Smith is accused of murdering several other people.

choice36c
choice36c:

(KING OF HARLEM HAIRDRESSERS-CELEBRITY CLIENTELE)
In 1983, Glenn Caldwell, a music teacher from Maryland, was playing saxophone in a South Carolina bar and began talking with a singer whose dapper outfit and slick hair seemed from a bygone era.
The man complimented Mr. Caldwell’s playing and introduced himself as Rogers Simon and began telling stories about all the musicians he had known, including Duke Ellington, Miles Davis and Nat King Cole.
Mr. Simon had made such acquaintances as a result of his talents. But he gained notoriety not as a musician, but as a hair stylist who at one time was the king of Harlem hairdressers.
He served as a personal barber for the likes of Mr. Cole and Mr. Ellington. But he was best known for tending to the head of Sugar Ray Robinson, the legendary boxer known as much for his style as his fighting skills.
“He was considered the best hairstylist in Harlem in his day,” said Mr. Caldwell, a professor at McDaniel College near Baltimore. He remembered being transfixed by all the photographs and clippings that Mr. Simon pulled out of his car trunk that night in 1983 to back up his claims that he lived for decades among a who’s who of figures in Harlem and jazz.
That evening stuck with Mr. Caldwell, who wound up connecting with Mr. Simon and interviewing him just before the barber died in 2005. Today, Mr. Simon remains nearly forgotten, but Mr. Caldwell’s research has turned into a book he is writing on Mr. Simon, expanding a historical footnote into a fascinating portrait of a charismatic figure who used his barbering skills to cut a glamorous swath through Harlem in its heyday.
In 1953, Jet magazine credited Mr. Simon with inventing “the process,” a technique of straightening and setting kinky hair by flattening it and greasing it down.
Actually, Mr. Caldwell said during a visit to New York recently, Mr. Simon invented a version of “the process,” in which he would style an S-pattern into the hair, a signature style that became popularized as the “finger-wave.”
“Nobody did it better than Roger,” said the Rev. Robert Royal, 84, whom Mr. Caldwell visited at his apartment. Mr. Royal, a well-known Harlem minister and lifelong friend of Sugar Ray Robinson, knew Mr. Simon better as Roger without an S.
Mr. Simon worked at Mr. Robinson’s well-known Golden Gloves Barber Shop in Harlem and became a vital part of the celebrated entourage that surrounded the champion welterweight and middleweight throughout the 1940s and ’50s.
“Roger and Ray were very close — wherever Ray went, that’s where Roger went,” Mr. Royal said, adding that the hair stylist would touch up Mr. Robinson’s coiffure during boxing matches.
“In between rounds, Roger would be combing it, putting it right back in place,” he said. “No matter how many times Ray fought, Roger would be in his corner. As fast as Ray would display his pugilistic charms, if a hair was out of place, Roger would jump up there and put it back in place.”
Glenn Caldwell, left, walked with Ray Robinson Jr. along a stretch in Harlem where Mr. Robinson’s father once owned several storefront businesses, including the barbershop where Rogers Simon worked.
Mr. Simon came to New York from his home in South Carolina in the early 1940s and experimented with his hair-setting process at many different shops. In 1943, Mr. Simon became a barber at the Esquire salon on Seventh Avenue in Harlem and styled celebrities including Mr. Ellington who took Mr. Simon on trips with the band, including one to the Middle East in the early 1960s.
“Rogers was the king of this hairstyle, which enabled him to travel with the highest of highbrows,” Mr. Caldwell said.
During his recent visit to New York, Mr. Caldwell met with Ray Robinson Jr., the boxer’s son, on the Harlem block where the the elder Mr. Robinson once owned a string of storefront businesses, including the barbershop, Sugar Ray’s Quality Cleaners Edna Mae’s Lingerie Shop (named for Mr. Robinson’s wife) and the popular Sugar Ray’s nightclub.
Standing on Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard between 123rd & 124th Streets, which last year was renamed “Sugar Ray Robinson Way,” Mr. Robinson said his father would get his hair touched up every day by Mr. Simon — either at the shop or at the Robinson family home in Riverdale, the Bronx.
Mr. Robinson said Mr. Simon used to babysit him, and he recalled traveling to Paris with his father when Mr. Simon was part of a paid entourage of 32 people. The barber was a fixture in the boxer’s custom flamingo-pink Cadillac, and even wrote an ode called “Here’s to Sugar Ray,” which he sang on television in the 1950s.
When the boxer moved to California in the late 1960s and 1970s, straightened hair had gone out of style. Still, the comedian Redd Foxx brought Mr. Simon to Los Angeles for a time to manage his barbershop.
After that, Mr. Simon traveled the country selling hair products. With several marriages in his past, he kept most of his possessions, photographs and mementos in his car, which eventually was towed and lost, Mr. Caldwell said. Mr. Simon died in 2005 with barely any mention.
“Here’s this guy that was at the center of a lot of history because of a hairstyle, and now he’s nearly forgotten,” Mr. Caldwell said. “I just want to help him leave his mark.”

choice36c:

(KING OF HARLEM HAIRDRESSERS-CELEBRITY CLIENTELE)

In 1983, Glenn Caldwell, a music teacher from Maryland, was playing saxophone in a South Carolina bar and began talking with a singer whose dapper outfit and slick hair seemed from a bygone era.

The man complimented Mr. Caldwell’s playing and introduced himself as Rogers Simon and began telling stories about all the musicians he had known, including Duke Ellington, Miles Davis and Nat King Cole.

Mr. Simon had made such acquaintances as a result of his talents. But he gained notoriety not as a musician, but as a hair stylist who at one time was the king of Harlem hairdressers.

He served as a personal barber for the likes of Mr. Cole and Mr. Ellington. But he was best known for tending to the head of Sugar Ray Robinson, the legendary boxer known as much for his style as his fighting skills.

“He was considered the best hairstylist in Harlem in his day,” said Mr. Caldwell, a professor at McDaniel College near Baltimore. He remembered being transfixed by all the photographs and clippings that Mr. Simon pulled out of his car trunk that night in 1983 to back up his claims that he lived for decades among a who’s who of figures in Harlem and jazz.

That evening stuck with Mr. Caldwell, who wound up connecting with Mr. Simon and interviewing him just before the barber died in 2005. Today, Mr. Simon remains nearly forgotten, but Mr. Caldwell’s research has turned into a book he is writing on Mr. Simon, expanding a historical footnote into a fascinating portrait of a charismatic figure who used his barbering skills to cut a glamorous swath through Harlem in its heyday.

In 1953, Jet magazine credited Mr. Simon with inventing “the process,” a technique of straightening and setting kinky hair by flattening it and greasing it down.

Actually, Mr. Caldwell said during a visit to New York recently, Mr. Simon invented a version of “the process,” in which he would style an S-pattern into the hair, a signature style that became popularized as the “finger-wave.”

“Nobody did it better than Roger,” said the Rev. Robert Royal, 84, whom Mr. Caldwell visited at his apartment. Mr. Royal, a well-known Harlem minister and lifelong friend of Sugar Ray Robinson, knew Mr. Simon better as Roger without an S.

Mr. Simon worked at Mr. Robinson’s well-known Golden Gloves Barber Shop in Harlem and became a vital part of the celebrated entourage that surrounded the champion welterweight and middleweight throughout the 1940s and ’50s.

“Roger and Ray were very close — wherever Ray went, that’s where Roger went,” Mr. Royal said, adding that the hair stylist would touch up Mr. Robinson’s coiffure during boxing matches.

“In between rounds, Roger would be combing it, putting it right back in place,” he said. “No matter how many times Ray fought, Roger would be in his corner. As fast as Ray would display his pugilistic charms, if a hair was out of place, Roger would jump up there and put it back in place.”

Glenn Caldwell, left, walked with Ray Robinson Jr. along a stretch in Harlem where Mr. Robinson’s father once owned several storefront businesses, including the barbershop where Rogers Simon worked.

Mr. Simon came to New York from his home in South Carolina in the early 1940s and experimented with his hair-setting process at many different shops. In 1943, Mr. Simon became a barber at the Esquire salon on Seventh Avenue in Harlem and styled celebrities including Mr. Ellington who took Mr. Simon on trips with the band, including one to the Middle East in the early 1960s.

“Rogers was the king of this hairstyle, which enabled him to travel with the highest of highbrows,” Mr. Caldwell said.

During his recent visit to New York, Mr. Caldwell met with Ray Robinson Jr., the boxer’s son, on the Harlem block where the the elder Mr. Robinson once owned a string of storefront businesses, including the barbershop, Sugar Ray’s Quality Cleaners Edna Mae’s Lingerie Shop (named for Mr. Robinson’s wife) and the popular Sugar Ray’s nightclub.

Standing on Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard between 123rd & 124th Streets, which last year was renamed “Sugar Ray Robinson Way,” Mr. Robinson said his father would get his hair touched up every day by Mr. Simon — either at the shop or at the Robinson family home in Riverdale, the Bronx.

Mr. Robinson said Mr. Simon used to babysit him, and he recalled traveling to Paris with his father when Mr. Simon was part of a paid entourage of 32 people. The barber was a fixture in the boxer’s custom flamingo-pink Cadillac, and even wrote an ode called “Here’s to Sugar Ray,” which he sang on television in the 1950s.

When the boxer moved to California in the late 1960s and 1970s, straightened hair had gone out of style. Still, the comedian Redd Foxx brought Mr. Simon to Los Angeles for a time to manage his barbershop.

After that, Mr. Simon traveled the country selling hair products. With several marriages in his past, he kept most of his possessions, photographs and mementos in his car, which eventually was towed and lost, Mr. Caldwell said. Mr. Simon died in 2005 with barely any mention.

“Here’s this guy that was at the center of a lot of history because of a hairstyle, and now he’s nearly forgotten,” Mr. Caldwell said. “I just want to help him leave his mark.”

choice36c
choice36c:

Gail Fisher (August 18, 1935 – December 2, 2000) was an actress who was one of the first African-American women to play substantive roles in American television. She was best known for playing the role of secretary “Peggy Fair” on the television detective series “Mannix,” from 1968 through 1975, a role for which she won two Golden Globe Awards and an Emmy Award. Fisher became the first African-American woman to win a Golden Globe.
The youngest of five children, Fisher was born in Orange, New Jersey. Her father died when she was two years old and she was raised by her mother, Ona Fisher,who raised her family with a home operated hair styling business while living in the Potter’s Crossing neighborhood of Edison, New Jersey. She graduated from Metuchen High School in Metuchen, New Jersey. During her teenage years she was a cheerleader and entered several beauty contests, winning the titles of Miss Transit, Miss Black New Jersey, and Miss Press Photographer.
In a contest sponsored by Coca-Cola, Fisher won the opportunity to spend two years studying acting at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. As a student of acting in New York City, she worked with Lee Strasberg and became a member of the Repertory Theater at Lincoln Center, where she worked with Elia Kazan and Herbert Blau. As a young woman, she also worked as a model.
Fisher made her first television appearance in 1960 at age 25, appearing in the syndicated program Play of the Week. Also during the early 1960s, she appeared in a television commercial for All laundry detergent, which she said made her “the first black female — no, make that black, period — to make a national TV commercial, on camera, with lines. In 1965 Herbert Blau cast her in a theatrical production of Danton’s Death.
She first appeared in Mannix during the second season, when Mannix left the detective firm Intertect and set up shop as a private investigator. In 1968, she made guest appearances on the TV series “My Three Sons,” “Love, American Style,” and “Room 222.” In 1970, her work on Mannix was honored when she received the Emmy Award for outstanding performance by an actress in a dramatic supporting role. In winning the Emmy, she beat out Susan Saint James in “The Name of the Game,” and Barbara Anderson in Ironside becoming the first African-American woman to win an Emmy Award. After Mannix was canceled in 1975 she rarely appeared on television. She guest-starred in a 1980 episode of The White Shadow.
Fisher was married and divorced twice. She had two daughters, Samara and Jole, from her 1964 first marriage to John Levy. Her previous marriage to the late Wali Muhammad (Walter Youngblood), famed corner man to Sugar Ray Robinson and Muhammad Ali, ended in divorce when he changed religions. Wali was also an assistant minister to Malcolm X at Nation of Islam Mosque No. 7.
She died in Los Angeles in 2000, aged 65, reportedly from renal failure. Twelve hours after Gail Fisher died, her brother Clifton died from heart failure. Gail Fisher was cremated.

choice36c:

Gail Fisher (August 18, 1935 – December 2, 2000) was an actress who was one of the first African-American women to play substantive roles in American television. She was best known for playing the role of secretary “Peggy Fair” on the television detective series “Mannix,” from 1968 through 1975, a role for which she won two Golden Globe Awards and an Emmy Award. Fisher became the first African-American woman to win a Golden Globe.

The youngest of five children, Fisher was born in Orange, New Jersey. Her father died when she was two years old and she was raised by her mother, Ona Fisher,who raised her family with a home operated hair styling business while living in the Potter’s Crossing neighborhood of Edison, New Jersey. She graduated from Metuchen High School in Metuchen, New Jersey. During her teenage years she was a cheerleader and entered several beauty contests, winning the titles of Miss Transit, Miss Black New Jersey, and Miss Press Photographer.

In a contest sponsored by Coca-Cola, Fisher won the opportunity to spend two years studying acting at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. As a student of acting in New York City, she worked with Lee Strasberg and became a member of the Repertory Theater at Lincoln Center, where she worked with Elia Kazan and Herbert Blau. As a young woman, she also worked as a model.

Fisher made her first television appearance in 1960 at age 25, appearing in the syndicated program Play of the Week. Also during the early 1960s, she appeared in a television commercial for All laundry detergent, which she said made her “the first black female — no, make that black, period — to make a national TV commercial, on camera, with lines. In 1965 Herbert Blau cast her in a theatrical production of Danton’s Death.

She first appeared in Mannix during the second season, when Mannix left the detective firm Intertect and set up shop as a private investigator. In 1968, she made guest appearances on the TV series “My Three Sons,” “Love, American Style,” and “Room 222.” In 1970, her work on Mannix was honored when she received the Emmy Award for outstanding performance by an actress in a dramatic supporting role. In winning the Emmy, she beat out Susan Saint James in “The Name of the Game,” and Barbara Anderson in Ironside becoming the first African-American woman to win an Emmy Award. After Mannix was canceled in 1975 she rarely appeared on television. She guest-starred in a 1980 episode of The White Shadow.

Fisher was married and divorced twice. She had two daughters, Samara and Jole, from her 1964 first marriage to John Levy. Her previous marriage to the late Wali Muhammad (Walter Youngblood), famed corner man to Sugar Ray Robinson and Muhammad Ali, ended in divorce when he changed religions. Wali was also an assistant minister to Malcolm X at Nation of Islam Mosque No. 7.

She died in Los Angeles in 2000, aged 65, reportedly from renal failure. Twelve hours after Gail Fisher died, her brother Clifton died from heart failure. Gail Fisher was cremated.

choice36c
choice36c:

"WAS BRUCE LEE SUPER HUMAN?"5. Catching Rice With Chopsticks:Although seemingly impractical, the sheer amount of pure dexterity and skill required for such a feat meant that his hand eye coordination had to be godlike. It was reported that Bruce was so obsessed to increase his reflexes, that he would throw rice into the air and try to catch it on the way down.4. Lee Was Too Strong For Normal Punching Bags:Lee’s custom heavy bag literally towered over others with its immense size. Normal heavy bags weigh in at around 70 pounds, with some weighing in at a much heavier 150. Lee’s weighed a stunning three-hundred pounds! And it was filled with metal. Not because he was showing off, but because he literally couldn’t use a lighter, non-metallic one without breaking it.3. The Infamous One-Inch Punch:Lee was able to gather so much power in his arms, that he could knock over a fully grown adult male from less than an inch away. That’s a feat so amazing that scientists poked around in martial artists’ brains, just to see how such a thing was even possible. Such incredible power.2. Films Had Too Be Slowed Down, Because He Was To Fast:It’s a fairly known fact that Lee’s movements were too fast for cameras to film, so they had to slow down the footage. Well, there’s some truth to that. But people seem to miss out on the coolest part. With no editing it would seem that he would dispatch his enemies by standing still he was so quick. Lee was so fast, that he had to slow down to first be seen as a blur! So they had to go through extra editing just for it just to be seen as normal!1. His Kicks Sent People Flying:For all his strength and training, Bruce Lee rarely would show his true power. Mainly because he was capable of injuring people just by standing a little too close to them.However, Bruce liked to pull a prank on people he would work with. One of Lee’s favorite possessions was his training shield, which he would take everywhere with him. One of his favorite “pranks” was to have people hold his training shield and let him kick them. The amount of power he put into each kick varied on the person, but could easily lift people into the air with one of his super human kicks.

choice36c:

"WAS BRUCE LEE SUPER HUMAN?"

5. Catching Rice With Chopsticks:

Although seemingly impractical, the sheer amount of pure dexterity and skill required for such a feat meant that his hand eye coordination had to be godlike. It was reported that Bruce was so obsessed to increase his reflexes, that he would throw rice into the air and try to catch it on the way down.

4. Lee Was Too Strong For Normal Punching Bags:

Lee’s custom heavy bag literally towered over others with its immense size. Normal heavy bags weigh in at around 70 pounds, with some weighing in at a much heavier 150. Lee’s weighed a stunning three-hundred pounds! And it was filled with metal. Not because he was showing off, but because he literally couldn’t use a lighter, non-metallic one without breaking it.

3. The Infamous One-Inch Punch:

Lee was able to gather so much power in his arms, that he could knock over a fully grown adult male from less than an inch away. That’s a feat so amazing that scientists poked around in martial artists’ brains, just to see how such a thing was even possible. Such incredible power.

2. Films Had Too Be Slowed Down, Because He Was To Fast:

It’s a fairly known fact that Lee’s movements were too fast for cameras to film, so they had to slow down the footage. Well, there’s some truth to that. But people seem to miss out on the coolest part. With no editing it would seem that he would dispatch his enemies by standing still he was so quick. Lee was so fast, that he had to slow down to first be seen as a blur! So they had to go through extra editing just for it just to be seen as normal!

1. His Kicks Sent People Flying:

For all his strength and training, Bruce Lee rarely would show his true power. Mainly because he was capable of injuring people just by standing a little too close to them.

However, Bruce liked to pull a prank on people he would work with. One of Lee’s favorite possessions was his training shield, which he would take everywhere with him. One of his favorite “pranks” was to have people hold his training shield and let him kick them. The amount of power he put into each kick varied on the person, but could easily lift people into the air with one of his super human kicks.

choice36c
choice36c:

All that Sammy Davis, Jr. needed to partake in a new vice was an invitation. From clichéd descents into drug addiction to rebellious embraces of Republican politicians, he took everything to an obsessive extreme. Sammy spent years in shame-free indulgence, screening 35 mm porn prints at parties, visiting adult-movie sets where he treated the actresses like Hollywood royalty, and taking fellatio lessons from Lovelace herself. As Sammy explained “I wanted to have every human experience.”Sammy started his personal relationship with Satan during a 1968 visit to the Factory, a nightclub he partially owned. He was invited to a party by a group of young actors sporting red fingernails, signifying their allegiance to the Church of Satan.When Sammy arrived at the party (whose theme he summarized as “dungeons and dragons and debauchery”), all attendees were wearing hoods or masks. The centerpiece of the “coven” was a naked woman chained spread-eagle on a red-velvet-covered alter. Davis was confident though that human sacrifice was not on the menu that evening. “That chick was happy,” he wrote, “and wasn’t really going to get anything sharper than a dildo stuck in her.”Not all the Satanists at that orgy would be so lucky. As Sammy was getting stoned and serviced, one of the ritual’s leaders tilted back his hood, revealing himself as Jay Sebring the singer’s barber. Hollywood’s all-time greatest hetero hairdresser, Sebring was responsible for the shaggy style sported by Jim Morrison, helped get Bruce Lee on TV, and was linked to actress Sharon Tate (before she married Roman Polanski). During the Manson Family’s infamous 1969 massacre, Sebring would be bound to Tate, shot, then stabbed seven times.

choice36c:

All that Sammy Davis, Jr. needed to partake in a new vice was an invitation. From clichéd descents into drug addiction to rebellious embraces of Republican politicians, he took everything to an obsessive extreme. Sammy spent years in shame-free indulgence, screening 35 mm porn prints at parties, visiting adult-movie sets where he treated the actresses like Hollywood royalty, and taking fellatio lessons from Lovelace herself. As Sammy explained “I wanted to have every human experience.”

Sammy started his personal relationship with Satan during a 1968 visit to the Factory, a nightclub he partially owned. He was invited to a party by a group of young actors sporting red fingernails, signifying their allegiance to the Church of Satan.

When Sammy arrived at the party (whose theme he summarized as “dungeons and dragons and debauchery”), all attendees were wearing hoods or masks. The centerpiece of the “coven” was a naked woman chained spread-eagle on a red-velvet-covered alter. Davis was confident though that human sacrifice was not on the menu that evening. “That chick was happy,” he wrote, “and wasn’t really going to get anything sharper than a dildo stuck in her.”

Not all the Satanists at that orgy would be so lucky. As Sammy was getting stoned and serviced, one of the ritual’s leaders tilted back his hood, revealing himself as Jay Sebring the singer’s barber. Hollywood’s all-time greatest hetero hairdresser, Sebring was responsible for the shaggy style sported by Jim Morrison, helped get Bruce Lee on TV, and was linked to actress Sharon Tate (before she married Roman Polanski). During the Manson Family’s infamous 1969 massacre, Sebring would be bound to Tate, shot, then stabbed seven times.

choice36c
choice36c:

The Force M.D’s “Relived” documentary splices together rare footage and testimonials from record company execs, hip-hop luminaries, family members, and members of New Edition and Boyz II Men, we get an extremely accurate portrayal of not only the come-up, but the undoing of The Force M.D.’s due to drugs, alcohol, shady record deals, shifts in the industry and the reality of death.The Force M.D.’s were trendsetters and really represented for the cats that weren’t traditional R&B fans; they rocked furs on album covers, gold chains, and didn’t have the cookie cutter looks as other groups did during that period of time. Yeah, The Force M.D.’s were for the streets. The documentary was made to serve as a reminder to those who’ve overlooked the group’s contributions and as an introduction to generations that hear the name and know the songs, but don’t know the history of the group, the triumphs or some of the trials they’ve faced.But what we didn’t know was the turmoil behind-the-scenes, which was tearing the group apart at the seams. DJ Dr. Rock parted ways with the group after the debut album. Jessie D.–known for his high-energy and Michael Jackson impersonations–had begun dabbling in drugs; that led to a downward spiral causing him to be ejected from the group and ultimately landed him in prison. Trisco began to abuse alcohol and later battled cancer. The records stopped selling, and more poignantly, Mercury died of a heart attack, Dr. Rock [passed], and lead singer T.C.D. died of ALS, better known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. 3 deaths within five years.During a screening, the audience became overwhelmed with emotion as each of these moments was discussed onscreen; however, once the credits rolled, there was Stevie D., Trisco, Jessie D., and Khalil–The Force M.D.’s relived. Today, they’re submitting their documentary to different film festivals, Trisco’s cancer is in remission, and they’re on stage doing what they’ve always done: harmonizing. Stevie’s rapping and dancing, Khalil is covering T.C.’s vocals and yes, Jessie is still breaking out those Michael Jackson moves. The Force M.D.’s are sharing their story, their successes and their heartbreaks.

choice36c:

The Force M.D’s “Relived” documentary splices together rare footage and testimonials from record company execs, hip-hop luminaries, family members, and members of New Edition and Boyz II Men, we get an extremely accurate portrayal of not only the come-up, but the undoing of The Force M.D.’s due to drugs, alcohol, shady record deals, shifts in the industry and the reality of death.

The Force M.D.’s were trendsetters and really represented for the cats that weren’t traditional R&B fans; they rocked furs on album covers, gold chains, and didn’t have the cookie cutter looks as other groups did during that period of time. Yeah, The Force M.D.’s were for the streets. The documentary was made to serve as a reminder to those who’ve overlooked the group’s contributions and as an introduction to generations that hear the name and know the songs, but don’t know the history of the group, the triumphs or some of the trials they’ve faced.

But what we didn’t know was the turmoil behind-the-scenes, which was tearing the group apart at the seams. DJ Dr. Rock parted ways with the group after the debut album. Jessie D.–known for his high-energy and Michael Jackson impersonations–had begun dabbling in drugs; that led to a downward spiral causing him to be ejected from the group and ultimately landed him in prison. Trisco began to abuse alcohol and later battled cancer. The records stopped selling, and more poignantly, Mercury died of a heart attack, Dr. Rock [passed], and lead singer T.C.D. died of ALS, better known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. 3 deaths within five years.

During a screening, the audience became overwhelmed with emotion as each of these moments was discussed onscreen; however, once the credits rolled, there was Stevie D., Trisco, Jessie D., and Khalil–The Force M.D.’s relived. Today, they’re submitting their documentary to different film festivals, Trisco’s cancer is in remission, and they’re on stage doing what they’ve always done: harmonizing. Stevie’s rapping and dancing, Khalil is covering T.C.’s vocals and yes, Jessie is still breaking out those Michael Jackson moves. The Force M.D.’s are sharing their story, their successes and their heartbreaks.